In the Beginning

Every blog has a first post.
If you’re reading this, you’re likely interested where I got my start so let’s go there now. I’ll be sure to stay on topic and sort/tag my other writing so you can skip to the stuff you care about.

I was born in – ha just kidding, I got my start writing code in my early teen years circa 2004 from a book about game programming my mom got me from Barnes&Noble. It taught me how to program in a system called BlitzBasic, and I later moved to its 3D rendering counterpart, Blitz3D. I don’t have a lot to show for it now but I had a lot of fun with my brothers making little toys and screensavers and so forth. One of these projects was a Super Smash Flash clone – an old web 2D Super Smash Bros. I had basic AI, and we only ever had the fake blue Mario from Super Mario Sunshine, Baby Bowser, Fox McCloud, and Lucario. Given that at the time only Melee was out, adding Lucario back then was particularly prescient.

In those teen years, I self-taught guitar, Adobe Photoshop, Blender, and I dabbled in a tiny bit of HTML and JS. I took piano and karate lessons (man, I was clumsy before that). I was a kid who always got high grades but seemingly tried to be good at everything at once. There was a trumpet and a recorder in there, I wrote my own sheet music, a few other random hobbies. (I made an underlit desk for art, with drawers out of K’nex) I wrote Pong from scratch and an AI for it on a calculator in study hall out of boredom. They were crazy years. I had a rough time in middle school and was homeschooled halfway through 6th grade, skipped 7th grade, and returned to public school as a junior and graduated at 16 in ’07.

I was always a weird “gifted” kid to my parents. Some people might find my list of hobbies extensive for a few teen years. It was just life. They had me tested as a first grader and IQ was… irrelevant, ask me somewhere else. I was a seeming rational oddball toting a TI-84 yet nobody knew I slept on the floor with the curtains open during full moons.
I’m writing this on 9/11, and I was in a weekly gifted class when the second plane hit. The teacher told us what was going on while the rest of the school was kept quiet. We read Don’t Sweat the Small Stuff For Teens in what time I spent in that class and I still credit it with having changed my life for the better at a lot of points. I’d still recommend it no matter your age.

Original cover I had

So that’s me as a kid. I went to a church university, then paused it and spent 2 years as a full missionary across the country. I decided I would go into Computer Science when I essentially came back to (for lack of a better term) civilian life (it’s that regulated and different). I did and the rest is history. I skipped the first course, which was good because I already had a year of general courses that I enjoyed but went nowhere. Married my wife, got the degree, and now I know stuff about things.

And here comes this blog, following my learning new stuff about new things and maybe helping you along the way.

Of course that’s not the whole story. I firmly believed in doing educational hobbies to supplement my education so I can make long-winded posts about each section of my college years, but now you know the man behind the handle.

Takeaway

I was mostly only ever smart because people kept telling me I was and I felt pressured to be. When I didn’t, none of my gifts mattered. You can only do whatever you think you can. So forget being a world champ or famous and go draw or build something great.
Take it from me, the second smartest guy in the room, who made friends with most of the smartest ones.

If you take away anything from this failed-polymath’s first post, take this:
You can be good at anything you decide you want to be good at.
All you need is self-discipline to make time and to try and to discard the notion that any non-competitive goal is out of reach.


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